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Tome & Folio - Books: Third Edition

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SnowAngel
(@snowangel)
Maiden of Monday Madness Moderator
Posted by: @valiantarcher

Congrats on the good progress on the Drew Farthering series, @SnowAngel! HA, isn't it crazy how sometimes one can get through a book so fast and then be so slow at others? Tongue
Oh, any particular Wodehouse for this year or just any?

Two of the books it took me five days to read each one, one of them I read in three days, so it all balanced out in the end. Smile It was very nice to read the Drew Farthering mysteries again, I enjoyed being able to read all the way through the series without having to wait for another book to be released. It's definitely a series that gets better the farther in one reads. I especially enjoyed all of the Sayers/Christie references this time round. So glad I got to read the Lord Peter Wimsey mysteries before I read this series again. Smile  

Last year Scarlet bought all the Psmith books in one volume and so I think I really really need to read them. Wink Of the four books in the series I've only read Leave It To Psmith and that was a few years ago now. Scarlet has a couple other Wodehouse collections that I haven't read as well and that I would like to read one of these days. Which one I ended up reading might depend on if someone else is reading one at the same time, there has been quite a bit of book sharing around here in the past few months.

Since I finished both the Drew Farthering mysteries and Wimpy Weak and Woke this week, I have started reading Sand by Will James and Defenders of the West: The Christian Heroes Who Stood Against Islam by Raymond Ibrahim. I've been wanting to read a Will James book for a while, it seemed a good time to read the one I bought in December. I saw Defenders of the West recommended several times and since I have been interested in reading a book about the Crusades it seemed a good choice, I got it via interlibrary loan, I am on the second chapter and it has been a fascinating read thus far. Smile  

SnowAngel


Christ is King.

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Posted : February 24, 2024 12:03 pm
Narnian78
(@narnian78)
NarniaWeb Guru

The Dickens movies and television series are well worth watching. I have many of them on DVD and one on blu-ray (The Mystery of Edwin Drood) and plan to watch them again soon. They are some of the most accurate adaptations of books created for television, although they were not always made on a high budget.  In many of the BBC productions made during the 1970’s and ‘80s the low budget really shows with programs that were almost like stage plays.  Since we know that Dickens loved the theatre (he was an actor as well as a writer) he may have even liked the programs if he were living today. They certainly looked old fashioned enough. There was no problem with them looking too modern!  🙂

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Posted : February 25, 2024 4:48 am
Narnian78
(@narnian78)
NarniaWeb Guru

I am still reading the Star Trek novels.  Rules of Engagement by Peter Morwood is quite a good novel set in the time of the movies which were made after the original series.  There is much about the Klingons in this novel, and if you like interesting complex villains the book would probably be for you. I also recently purchased The World of Star Trek by David Gerrold.  I think it is good for reading about the beginning of Star Trek and how Gene Roddenberry brought the series to network television. So many fine books were written about Star Trek. 🙂

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Posted : March 8, 2024 2:01 pm
johobbit
(@jo)
SO mod; WC captain Moderator

After having finished the rather voluminous tome of To the Golden Shores (the fascinating bio of Adoniram Judson, one of the first protestant missionaries to Burma), I had others to start in my To-Read pile, but when @fantasia recommended Killers of the Flower Moon, I nabbed a copy and plunged right in. What an emotionally difficult, but important, read. So much mistreatment, deception, tragedy in the Osage Nation of Oklahoma (early 1900s). I have 100 pages left. This is a hard book to put down.

My current car book (I always have a 'waiting book' there) is Clothed with Strength: Women who built the church and changed the world by Sarah Allen. This book contains mini biographies on four women: Rebecca Protten, Hannah More, Ellen Raynard, and Josephine Butler. The only one I have heard of and studied is Hannah More (the Clapham group, which included William Wilberforce, another hero of mine), so I am learning a good deal about the other three. I think I saw this book recommended on The Gospel Coalition, and knew I'd be interested in it, so picked it up shortly after.

Another waiting book I have is A Captain's Duty: Somali pirates, navy seals, and dangerous days at sea by Captain Richard Phillips. His story of being hijacked by pirates near Somalia in 2009 was made into a film, Captain Phillips in 2013 (Tom Hanks). The language is a bit much at times, but, man, what a terrifying ordeal. Thankfully it turned out in the end, which is often not the way when pirates manage to board and capture a merchant marine vessel.

EDIT: As for audio books, I finished going through Andy Serkis' The Hobbit, The Fellowship of the Ring and The Two Towers—all for the second time (absolutely excellent), as well as a number of shorter books by Focus on the Family, the BBC, and the James Herriot stories (read by Christopher Timothy), and am now making my way through Jim Dale's Harry Potter audios (so well done!). I just finished The Man Born to be King (Dorothy Sayers, BBC) and am starting this twelve-cycle play again, as there is a lot to take in. I am quite impressed! (I will get to Serkis' Return of the King, just not quite yet. Hoping this will be a gift from my kiddos for Mother's Day/my birthday. Wink Bats eyes Smile )


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Posted : March 8, 2024 2:27 pm
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Col Klink
(@col-klink)
NarniaWeb Junkie

@jo I haven't finished listening to the Audible production of The Man Born to be King yet (I'm saving the last five episodes for Holy Week) so I wasn't going to post about it until then. But if you enjoyed it so much that you're listening to all it over again right after finishing it, I feel compelled to beg you to get your hands on the published scripts. 

The Man Born to Be King: Dorothy Sayers: 9781600512490: Amazon.com: Books

While the Audible version is very good, they had to cut a lot of stuff to keep each episode 42 minutes and much of that stuff was great, important even. For example, I believe the Audible version retains only two, count 'em, two parables. Dorothy Sayers also emphasized in her scripts that the crowds listening to John the Baptist should consist of three groups with very different reactions. Audible wasn't really able to convey this nuance, understandably but still regrettably. The exchanges between the Virgin Mary and the magic also make less sense with the tightened script. 

Spoiler
Spoilers
I'm also disappointed that in Judas's first dialogue scene, Audible has him give his name right away. Sayers had him only mention he was from Kerioth, a clue to those in the know, and only reveal who he was at the end of the conversation as a surprise for other listeners.

Here's a bit of dialogue from the second episode that I think is a good example of an unfortunate cut. (I'm highlighting the parts that Audible omitted.) It's between Jesus and a little boy called Isaac and his sister, Miriam. 

Isaac: There, Miriam, I told you-(catches himself up) I didn't say it, did I? Not really and truly say it. I shut my mouth up quite tight-m'm-like that. Didn't I?

Jesus (laughing): You resisted temptation like a man.

Isaac (cheerfully): Next time I'll just think it and not say it. 

Jesus: Oh, no. An ugly thought is as bad as an ugly word.

Miriam: Father says, "Keep the Law and speak no evil." But if you don't say the same as you think, it isn't telling the truth.

Jesus: No. But you see, if you always think good thoughts, you won't want to say naughty things. Then you won't have to bother about keeping the Law because your own loving thoughts will keep it for you.

For better or worse-for who knows what may unfold from a chrysalis?-hope was left behind.
-The God Beneath the Sea by Leon Garfield & Edward Blishen check out my new blog!

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Posted : March 9, 2024 6:57 pm
johobbit
(@jo)
SO mod; WC captain Moderator
Posted by: @col-klink

I feel compelled to beg you to get your hands on the published scripts. 

Indeed, that has been my plan. Thanks for your post! I appreciate the insistence, as others also have begged me. I look forward to eventually reading the play. Smile  

One niggly bit I can't get past is how old both Mary and Joseph sound, among other characters. Another irk is the way Jesus calls his disciples, one by one: "Follow Me" is spoken in a whisper, kind of eerie, if you ask me. Not fond of that at all. And what's with Jesus' 'golden beard'?! Eyebrow  

I am nearly finished Killers of the Flower Moon, and don't think I will forget this tragic history anytime soon.

Only a few more months until I start my biennial read of The Lord of the Rings. I really need a re-read of The Silmarillion soon too! Also I will soon be starting a re-read of Bonhoeffer: pastor, martyr, prophet, spy by Eric Metaxas. I first read this tome when it was published in 2010, and have been wanting a re-read for quite awhile. Well, now is the time. I am eager to dive back in to Bonhoeffer's amazing and hard story!


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Posted : March 10, 2024 6:08 am
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Narnian78
(@narnian78)
NarniaWeb Guru

I am now reading Rihannsu by Diane Duane, a collection of Star Trek novels mainly about the Romulans. The novels include My Enemy, My Ally, The Romulan Way, Swordhunt, and Honor Blade.  They look like very fine stories which are set during the time of the original series.  It is a wonderful collection which any fans of the Star Trek original series should enjoy. The original series is my favorite Star Trek, which was first broadcast in 1966 - 1969.  For me that series has actually become better with age. 🙂

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Posted : March 10, 2024 3:34 pm
Col Klink
(@col-klink)
NarniaWeb Junkie

I recently finished one of the books I got for Christmas, The Outlaws of Sherwood by Robin McKinley. The characterizations, humor and prose were very engaging. The book is what TVTropes.org would call a "decon recon switch." It points out all of the impracticalities and inconveniences of the whole Robin Hood premise. But ultimately, these more pragmatic versions of the Robin Hood characters are just as noble and competent as their more traditional counterparts-or nearly so anyway. This balance makes for a highly suspenseful climax as the readers really aren't sure whether Richard the Lionheart is going to pardon the heroes or punish them.

It's a good thing though that the book's characterizations, humor and prose are so good because the story isn't very well structured. Most of the first two thirds is just buildup and character introductions without much action or suspense. Then in the final third, there's suddenly so much action and suspense that it feels jarring, almost as if the book has turned into something totally different. Because of this, I find my attention wandering during both sections. I don't know how often I'm going to want to reread the book, but I am glad I read it once. 

For better or worse-for who knows what may unfold from a chrysalis?-hope was left behind.
-The God Beneath the Sea by Leon Garfield & Edward Blishen check out my new blog!

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Posted : March 12, 2024 4:05 pm
Varnafinde
(@varna)
Princess of the Noldor and Royal Overseer of the Talk About Narnia forum Moderator

I've got - or read - some of Robin McKinley's other books, and liked them very much, especially The Blue Sword and The Hero and the Crown. If I ever come across this Sherwood book, I'll definitely want to read it. Thanks for the warning about its structure, though!

In one of her books, one of her characters goes into a library of books that have not been written yet at the time of her story - and I was pleased to see that one example was The Chronicles of Narnia Giggle  


(avi artwork by Henning Janssen)

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Posted : March 13, 2024 10:34 pm
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SnowAngel
(@snowangel)
Maiden of Monday Madness Moderator

Oh, I had forgotten about The Outlaws of Sherwood, it's been ages since I read that one.

I tried to finish Defenders of the West during the month of February, ended up finishing it on March 1st, so close. It was a fascinating read, although definitely difficult at times. I particularly enjoyed the chapter about Richard the Lionheart. And since the last chapter was about Vlad III Dracula (and his brother Radu), I think I really need to read Ashtown Burials by N.D. Wilson because I know Vlad Dracula is mention and I think his brother is

Spoiler
the...
villain in Empire of Bones and Silent Bells.
I'm definitely going to read Sword and Scimitar also by Raymond Ibrahim, so it's on my library list for sometime soonish.

Followed Defender of the West with Is Davis A Traitor? by Albert Taylor Bledsoe which I finished reading yesterday, I'm wondering if I should have read The Federalist Papers (I bought a copy last year) before starting Is Davis A Traitor? since they were reference numerous times throughout the book, and I've only ever read snippets of The Federalist Papers. Is Davis A Traitor? is another book that was recommend on one of the podcasts I enjoy listening to and it was definitely worth reading.

This month I also read Jed Smith: Trailblazer of the West by Frank Latham, Cyrus by Jacob Abbott, and Paul Revere: Boston Patriot by Augusta Stevenson. I liked the books about Jed Smith and Paul Revere, didn't care for the one about Cyrus.

Now I reading A Quiet Neighborhood by George MacDonald and Luke: The Gospel of Amazement by Michael Card. And I also pulled Do More Better by Tim Challies back out to finish, maybe this time I will. Giggle  First time reading A Quiet Neighborhood, previously I have only ever read George MacDonald's adult novels that Michael Phillips edited. 

SnowAngel


Christ is King.

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Posted : March 23, 2024 1:52 pm
Narnian78
(@narnian78)
NarniaWeb Guru

I would encourage anyone who likes Star Trek to read Diane Duane’s novels.  I am almost finished with the Rihannsu series and plan to continue with others written by her and other Star Trek authors.  It is taking me longer than usual to read the stories, but the content is deep and the books are well written.  It certainly is time well spent for those who love science fiction. 

I am now reading Federation by Judith and Garfield Reeves-Stevens.  I think it is set during the same time as the movie Star Trek Generations since James Kirk and Jean Luc Picard are both characters in the story.  It seems like a very well written book.  There are other Star Trek books which are collaborations, but they often good stories written by two or more authors.   I think I will enjoy the book very much.

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Posted : April 1, 2024 8:36 pm
Silverlily
(@silverlily)
NarniaWeb Junkie

@narnian78 I have heard good things about Duane's work in the Star Trek universe but haven't yet read any of it. I am deeply fond on several of her Young Wizards series books however, and have also enjoyed some of her short stories, so I am interested in giving her other work a shot.

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Posted : April 3, 2024 10:40 pm
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johobbit
(@jo)
SO mod; WC captain Moderator

Currently, I am having a few excellent ('though very difficult subject matter) re-reads:

Bonhoeffer: pastor, martyr, prophet, spy by Eric Metaxas (2010) - this large tome never fails to move and inspire me.

Village of Secrets: Defying the Nazis in Vichy France by Caroline Moorehead (2014) - these previously untold stories have come to light and astound me with their self-sacrificial, quiet, dedicated courage

The Volunteer: the true story of the resistance hero who infiltrated Auschwitz by Jack Fairweather (2019) - more documents and information were discovered in the 1990s that enabled the author to pursue what really happened in Polish Witold Pilecki's altruistic life, and, over years, place together this incredible tale.

I also had an Audible credit, which went straight towards Andy Serkis' brilliant reading of The Return of the King. Smile  

For something much lighter—and very delightful—I am trying to find my old copy of Miss Buncle's Book by D. E. Stevenson (1934), which I know I put back in our library, but do you think we can track it down? No doubt it will show up somewhere soon. Giggle  


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Posted : April 16, 2024 3:07 am
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