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Books: 2nd Edition

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shastastwin
(@shastastwin)
Member Moderator Emeritus

Yep, I read it years ago. I want to say several people on the old forum had read it as well. wisewoman in particular comes to mind. It wouldn't have compared it to Chicken Run, but it does have a bit of a Redwallian feel. It's a bit more openly spiritual in its themes and morality, though. The main thing that sticks in my mind is the mythic nature of the story. (Also, I always felt like Rock-A-Doodle should have been more like The Book of the Dun Cow.)

"All the world will be your enemy, Prince with a Thousand Enemies. And when they catch you, they will kill you. But first they must catch you..."
Inexhaustible Inspiration

6689 posts from forum 1.0

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Posted : September 14, 2021 6:23 pm
fantasia
(@fantasia)
Member Admin
Posted by: @shastastwin

It wouldn't have compared it to Chicken Run,

Because it has chickens. Giggle Wink  

@Jo, it loosely reminds me of 'Lamb Among the Stars.'

Well, I liked it! I actually liked it quite a bit. I wouldn't say it's an accurate representation of the Christian God if that's what people are expecting when they go into it, but it's still a very enjoyable book none-the-less. At least it was to me. Wink  

@mel and @shastastwin, have you read the sequels?

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Posted : September 16, 2021 2:41 pm
johobbit liked
shastastwin
(@shastastwin)
Member Moderator Emeritus

@fantasia Ah, yes. I can see that. Giggle  

I haven't read The Book of Sorrows yet. I remember hearing it was aptly titled and haven't quite steeled myself for it. I need to go back and reread the first one, though. Despite not retaining the details, I can't deny that the tone and imagery have remained strong in my imagination all these years later.

"All the world will be your enemy, Prince with a Thousand Enemies. And when they catch you, they will kill you. But first they must catch you..."
Inexhaustible Inspiration

6689 posts from forum 1.0

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Posted : September 16, 2021 7:44 pm
Col Klink
(@col-klink)
NarniaWeb Nut
Posted by: @fantasia

@Jo, it loosely reminds me of 'Lamb Among the Stars.'

Well, I liked it! I actually liked it quite a bit. I wouldn't say it's an accurate representation of the Christian God if that's what people are expecting when they go into it, but it's still a very enjoyable book none-the-less. At least it was to me. Wink    

Pardon me, are you talking about Redwall? That's the last book I remember both you and Johobbit posting about.

For better or worse-for who knows what may unfold from a chrysalis?-hope was left behind.
-The God Beneath the Sea by Leon Garfield & Edward Blishen check out my new blog!

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Posted : September 16, 2021 8:47 pm
fantasia
(@fantasia)
Member Admin

@col-klink, no, The Book of the Dun Cow by Walter Wangerin Jr. I mentioned it at the very bottom of the previous page. Smile   Jo and I discussed it elsewhere, not on this particular thread. 

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Posted : September 16, 2021 9:44 pm
Col Klink liked
SnowAngel
(@snowangel)
Maiden of Monday Madness Moderator

My library finally got Christianity and Wokeness by Owen Strachan in last week! I'm about 90 pages into it. Since I read Fault Lines by Voddie Baucham a couple months ago, I was very eager to follow it with Christianity and Wokeness. This is the first book I have read by Owen Strachan, I am enjoying his writing style. I wouldn't say the same of the subject matter, but I do think it's an important topic to read about.

SnowAngel


"Live your risk." - Buck Sexton

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Posted : September 17, 2021 12:38 pm
daughter of the King
(@dot)
Princess Dot Moderator

I'm positive I've heard of Book of the Dun Cow before, but I don't think I've read it. *adds to ever-growing to-read list* Giggle  

We Are Okay turned out to be not so much a romance as the aftermath of a romance that fell apart when the characters went their separate ways. It was heavier than I expected, but I generally like complicated relationships more than the insta-love that plagues most YA.

Gods of Jade and Shadow was fun. Very much a fairytale setting, and the prose was more myth-like than modern. It definitely got mixed reviews at book club though. I was ready to dislike the potential romantic relationship but the ending turned out differently than I first thought so that pleased me.

I have also recently read Goddess in the Machine by Lora Beth Johnson, and Graceling by Kristen Cashore for YA club. Goddess was a fun genre exploration with one of the point-of-view characters having the perspective of a fantasy, and the other more science-fiction. Tech as magic is one of my favorite tropes.

Graceling has a good premise. Some people have different superpowers/magical abilities which are then used/exploited by the royal families of the various countries. It felt a bit disjointed at times because the three acts didn't gel together very well and threw off the pacing. I'm kind of tempted to skip the second book in the series (which is a prequel) and jump to the third book which is a continuation of the story of one of my favorite characters.

Read Parable of the Sower by Octavia E. Butler for SFF club. Very heavy dystopia that feels a little too real. It was good, but I think it will be awhile before I read the sequel.

I'm currently about 3/4 of the way through How the Multiverse Got Its Revenge by K. Eason. So far it's an excellent sequel to How Rory Thorne Destroyed the Multiverse. It's feels more science fiction than fairytale, but that might be because there's less court intrigue and a lot more space ships.

Next up is The Ten Thousand Doors of January by Alix E. Harrow for SFF club. Portal fantasy!

Narniaweb sister to Pattertwig's Pal

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Posted : September 17, 2021 3:17 pm
fantasia
(@fantasia)
Member Admin
Posted by: @shastastwin

I remember hearing it was aptly titled and haven't quite steeled myself for it.

I was wondering if it might be similar to The Princess and the Goblin and The Princess and Curdie (if I'm remembering the titles correctly). I liked the first one pretty well, but the way the second one ended was just stupid and kind of spoiled my taste for both. I'll probably pass on The Book of Sorrows then. 

The kids and I just finished up YWAM's Captain John Smith for school. Shocked That was quite a book. Like one of those where you often have to remind yourself that it's non-fiction..... It certainly doesn't read that way. All I knew of him before was the infamous interaction between him and Pocahontas. But someone in Hollywood ought to pick up his story and make a movie out of it. They wouldn't even have to add in drama!! LOL 
We've moved onto Pocahontas: True Princess by Mari Hanes, which I'm pretty sure was recommended to me by people on this forum.

I am currently reading The Mysterious Benedict Society. I'm a quarter of the way in and it's pretty fun so far. It reminds me of A Serious of Unfortunate Events. Anyone else read this one?

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Posted : September 23, 2021 3:12 pm
Col Klink
(@col-klink)
NarniaWeb Nut
Posted by: @fantasia

The kids and I just finished up YWAM's Captain John Smith for school. Shocked That was quite a book. Like one of those where you often have to remind yourself that it's non-fiction..... It certainly doesn't read that way.

I'm not familiar with that book (or maybe I am; I guess I haven't been paying close enough attention to this thread as I don't know who YWAM is Giggle ) but I remember hearing in history class as a kid that Capt. John Smith greatly exaggerated his exploits. Maybe the book you read was taking his exaggerations as fact. (I'm sorry if I'm ruining it for you. It's just that I know you're a homeschool Mom and I thought you'd want to know if there was even a chance you were giving your kids faulty information.)

For better or worse-for who knows what may unfold from a chrysalis?-hope was left behind.
-The God Beneath the Sea by Leon Garfield & Edward Blishen check out my new blog!

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Posted : September 23, 2021 4:59 pm
fantasia liked
Meltintalle
(@mel)
Member Moderator

@fantasia, nope, I haven't read Book of Sorrows, for much the same reason as Stwin. Giggle I'll let you know, though, if I end up reading it after the request for Book of the Dun Cow comes in and a reread goes well...

I have read Mysterious Benedict Society and most (all?) of the sequels. Aren't the character names fun? I think Constance is my favorite, but I'm partial to all the kids. 

I'm currently reading The Permaculture Handbook by Peter Bane, which started off as a slog and has finally begun discussing practical considerations in practical language. Some of the philosophy has sparked some interesting thoughts, but mostly I'm here for the swales and coppicing and companion planting...

avy by Djaq

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Posted : September 23, 2021 8:29 pm
fantasia liked
Narnian78
(@narnian78)
NarniaWeb Nut

@fantasia

I read the Mysterious Benedict Society series of books a few years ago and found them to be wholesome and entertaining stories for children. They were donated to my church library, and I decided to include them in the collection.  I would highly recommend them to anyone who likes interesting stories. 

This post was modified 1 day ago 2 times by Narnian78
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Posted : September 25, 2021 7:29 am
fantasia liked
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