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2 – Jill Is Given a Task  

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Movie Aristotle
(@risto)
NarniaWeb Junkie

4. Why doesn't the lion promise not to eat Jill?

I think he's teaching her to trust. Or maybe he's testing her.

5. The Lion says he has “swallowed up girls and boys, women and men, kings and emperors, cities and realms.” Do you think he means this literally?

Well, I think he ate Jadis, didn't he? It's possible he meant some items on the list literally, and others in a figurative sense, as in he put an end to that realm. Who knows? [spoiler="The Magician's Nephew"]Perhaps that's what happened to the pool of Charn. Maybe Aslan got thirsty.[/spoiler]

6. Lewis writes that approaching the stream to drink “was the worst thing [Jill] had ever had to do.” What was so bad about it? What does this tell us about Jill?

I would think it very scary to have to drink with a lion behind you. Especially one that says it eats people and who refuses to promise not to eat you.

7. Why does the Lion want Jill to admit she was showing off?

I think if Jill hadn't come to the realization that she was to blame for Eustace falling off the cliff, it would have lead to some untimely squabbles in Narnia. Aslan dealt with the issue, made sure Jill learned from it, and then moved on to the real task at hand.

8. Lewis writes: “It was very alarming walking back to the edge of the cliff, especially as the Lion did not walk with her but behind her—making no noise on his soft paws.” What makes this so alarming?

Again, Jill is completely out of control in this situation, and is forced to trust a strange lion whom she fears.

10. How do you think Eustace felt when he was being blown into Narnia? How would you feel if you were being blown on Aslan’s breath?

Confused at first, but I think he's a smart chap. He'd figure out it was magic soon enough. I expect his experience was in many ways like Jill's.

11. Jill is disappointed when she realizes that Scrubb probably had the experience of sleeping on air before she did. Why does this bother her?

I think she was excited at the thought that she might be the first to have ever done something, and then was disappointed when she realized that Eustace was undoubtedly the first -which I suppose she's now kicking herself for, since she was the reason Eustace fell and had to be blown to safety in the first place.

Movie Aristotle, AKA Risto

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Posted : August 6, 2017 10:40 am
Eustace
(@eustace)
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2. The Lion’s voice “did not make [Jill] any less frightened than she had been before, but it made her frightened in rather a different way.” What types of fear is Lewis distinguishing between?

I thought Lewis might be referring to the awestruck feeling you can get when you are very surprised about something. This type of fear is a synonym for horrified and frightened. It is very different to hear about animals talking and to see a huge lion talk in real life.

4. Why doesn't the lion promise not to eat Jill?

Aslan wanted to let her know that He was not a tame lion. He might not be safe but He is good. He wanted her to teach her a lesson in trusting Him without Him having to say it.

5. The Lion says he has “swallowed up girls and boys, women and men, kings and emperors, cities and realms.” Do you think he means this literally?

I never took it really literally, but I could it could be both literally and figuratively. Literally, Aslan as being who He was could have swallowed up people, cities, and realms, and if things were really that bad like in Charn, I don’t see why He wouldn’t have. But, there is also the possibility that Aslan was just talking about figuratively.


7. Why does the Lion want Jill to admit she was showing off?

It may have to do with Jill understanding that she has a problem in that area of her life. After all, they say you can’t fix a problem unless you know you have it. But, also I think it had to do with Jill realizing why she had done it in the first place. Jill may not have been thinking about the real reason why she was doing that and instead making excuses in her mind. I think she needed to admit it out loud to see how dumb that really was.

8. Lewis writes: “It was very alarming walking back to the edge of the cliff, especially as the Lion did not walk with her but behind her—making no noise on his soft paws.” What makes this so alarming?
Jill did not trust the Lion because she did not really know Him yet.
I think Jill was still afraid of Aslan as she should be, she was afraid she might die. The feeling though that she was feeling is similar to the feeling people get when they know someone is following them but they can’t hear them or when they turn around they can’t see them


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Posted : August 21, 2017 11:35 am
narnia fan 7
(@narnia-fan-7)
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Why doesn't the lion promise not to eat Jill?

Even if he had promised not to eat her Jill still might have still been uneasy. I think it was better in the long run for Aslan to show Jill he was trustworthy rather than telling her.

Lewis writes: “It was very alarming walking back to the edge of the cliff, especially as the Lion did not walk with her but behind her—making no noise on his soft paws.” What makes this so alarming?

Even though Jill knows Asian isn't going to hurt her he's still an intimidating figure, and I think it's always unnerving knowing something is behind you but not being able to hear it.

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Posted : March 15, 2018 4:42 am
Valiant_Nymph
(@valiant_nymph)
NarniaWeb Junkie

1. When the Lion first sees Jill, he turns away “as if it knew her quite well and didn’t think much of her.” Why does the Lion seem to have a low opinion of Jill?
I don't think the Lion has a low opinion of her, but I see it more as Jill reading the situation that way. The Lion (or Aslan), shows that Jill is not the centre of the universe -- and Jill is affronted by that.

2. The Lion’s voice “did not make [Jill] any less frightened than she had been before, but it made her frightened in rather a different way.” What types of fear is Lewis distinguishing between?

I really love this whole scene. Lewis doesn't clarify exactly what the difference is, but I always imagined it was a fear that was tinged with excitement, and wanting to know who Aslan was.

3. Jill stares at the stream for “what seemed like hours.” Why does the Lion wait so long before speaking?
It probably isn't actually hours; Jill feels this way because she is so thirsty. But I think Aslan wants to give Jill the opportunity to be bold and drink before he steps in. It is giving her at least a chance to show courage, and therefore develop as a character, before providing assistance.

4. Why doesn't the lion promise not to eat Jill?

I suppose he is admitting who is: someone who has actually eaten people, someone who is not tame. And he wants to push Jill to trust him. She is going to have to do that on her journey -- risk destroying herself by setting Rilian free, for example. This scene foreshadows how her character eventually develops

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Posted : May 5, 2018 5:19 pm
JillPoleFriend
(@jillpolefriend)
NarniaWeb Nut

Why do you think Aslan is so harsh with Jill? This always bothered me a bit when I first read the book. I mean, if she is already insecure, shouldn't he be a bit more gentle? I like Aslan! I was just confused by this part.

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Posted : May 10, 2018 7:12 am
Pattertwigs Pal
(@pattertwigs-pal)
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Why do you think Aslan is so harsh with Jill? This always bothered me a bit when I first read the book. I mean, if she is already insecure, shouldn't he be a bit more gentle? I like Aslan! I was just confused by this part.

I wouldn't go so far as to say that Aslan was harsh with Jill. Stern yes. It wouldn't do for him to be too gentle with her. She was about to go on a hard and dangerous journey. She would need to be prepared. She needed to learn a bit about Aslan that he isn't safe but he is good.

1. When the Lion first sees Jill, he turns away “as if it knew her quite well and didn’t think much of her.” Why does the Lion seem to have a low opinion of Jill?
Jill despised Eustace for his fear and put herself in danger by showing off. As a result of her action, Eustace ends up falling off the cliff. Her actions seem to explain it.

2. The Lion’s voice “did not make [Jill] any less frightened than she had been before, but it made her frightened in rather a different way.” What types of fear is Lewis distinguishing between?
Fear as in panic and danger to her physical body. Reverential fear and maybe spiritual fear.

3. Jill stares at the stream for “what seemed like hours.” Why does the Lion wait so long before speaking?
I think he was giving her a chance to speak or she was really off on her time and it was only a few minutes before he spoke.

4. Why doesn't the lion promise not to eat Jill?
He wants her to trust him.

5. The Lion says he has “swallowed up girls and boys, women and men, kings and emperors, cities and realms.” Do you think he means this literally?
I always assumed so. It is probably his way of destroying things that need to be destroyed. Instead of using fire and brimstone, they are eaten. I do like Movie Aristotle’s idea [spoiler=]that Aslan got thirsty and drank Charn’s pool.[/spoiler]

6. Lewis writes that approaching the stream to drink “was the worst thing [Jill] had ever had to do.” What was so bad about it? What does this tell us about Jill?
She didn’t know what would happen. It wasn’t a safe situation to be in. She has learned some caution. She is not rushing into things.

7. Why does the Lion want Jill to admit she was showing off?
Confession is good. She needs to realize what caused her to make the choices she did so she can learn from them.

8. Lewis writes: “It was very alarming walking back to the edge of the cliff, especially as the Lion did not walk with her but behind her—making no noise on his soft paws.” What makes this so alarming?
She can’t see what he is doing and can’t hear where he is. She doesn't know Aslan very well. She is also going back to where Eustace fell of the cliff trying to save her.

9. How are the first and fourth signs different than the second and third? Why do you think this is?
The first and the fourth involve people they should meet. The second and the third refer to places they will go. They need help on their journey, and they are more likely to get that from a person than a place and they are journeying to a person. The middle two signs tell them how to get where they need to be.

10. How do you think Eustace felt when he was being blown into Narnia? How would you feel if you were being blown on Aslan’s breath?
He was feeling relived that he didn’t get killed. If Aslan’s breath was like the breath he used to strength Susan’s nerves, then I am sure he was fine and enjoying himself. Otherwise he might be scared because of the height. If Aslan’s breath made me feel safe and unafraid then I would likely enjoy it. If the breath merely provided for physical support, I would be terrified and worried about getting down. I would probably also be dizzy.

11. Jill is disappointed when she realizes that Scrubb probably had the experience of sleeping on air before she did. Why does this bother her?
People like to be the first one to do certain kinds of things.


Silver Chair Reading Group
NW sister to Movie Aristotle & daughter of the King

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Posted : March 21, 2020 10:40 am
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