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johobbit
(@jo)
SO mod; WC captain Moderator

My copy of The Dragon's Tooth should be arriving sometime this month. Dancing Now, I'm really hoping I like it! LOL

For the first time in my life, I am reading Uncle Tom's Cabin. Very gripping. I have been meaning to read this for years, and actually can't believe it is not mandatory reading for high school, at least when I was in those years (long ago Giggle ) .

The read is excellent and tough at the same time.

7,237 posts from Forum 1.0

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Posted : July 4, 2020 4:56 pm
SnowAngel liked
Wanderer Between Worlds
(@wanderer)
NarniaWeb Nut
Posted by: @reepicheep775

Ray Bradbury might be my favourite author after C. S. Lewis. Farenheit 451 is one of my favourite books and I absolutely love his short stories, despite not being the biggest fan of short stories in general. I haven't read any of his stuff for a few years, but I picked up Bradbury Stories: 100 of His Most Celebrated Tales recently and I'll be reading through it soon.

Fahrenheit 451 is on my to-read list!  Also, that collection might be the one that I’m reading right now.  My favorite short story is “There Will Come Soft Rains” because of the figurative language alone. Bradbury creates wonderful atmosphere, and ties in the title very well. What are your favorite Bradbury short stories? 

@fantasia 

That’s sweet that you have discussions with your kids!  I’ll have to give Sarah, Plain and Tall another look. Wink My cousin also recommended Something Wicked This Way Comes to me, so I will have to find time to read it!

 

 

"I am,” said Aslan. "But there I have another name. You must learn to know me by that name. This was the very reason why you were brought to Narnia, that by knowing me here for a little, you may know me better there.”

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Posted : July 8, 2020 9:27 am
SnowAngel
(@snowangel)
Maiden of Monday Madness Moderator
Posted by: @johobbit

My copy of The Dragon's Tooth should be arriving sometime this month. Dancing Now, I'm really hoping I like it! LOL  

Thumbs up My little siblings are currently reading through the 100 Cupboards and waiting for The Legend of Sam Miracle to be available at the library so they can read The Outlaws of Time. My letting them read through nearly all of N.D. Wilson's books has been the highlight of this crazy year for them. I was going to make them spread them out over a longer period of time, but I caved when we didn't have new library books. Giggle I'm looking forward to rereading both the 100 Cupboards and The Outlaws of Time soon myself, especially since I caved and bought the whole 100 Cupboards series last month. Grin   We already had all, but Dandelion Fire in the house, however I wasn't interested in just buying the one we didn't have. Wink  

Has anyone gotten chapter two of The Silent Bells? I was thrilled to see the download for chapters one and two in the email yesterday. Grin  

Ah, Sarah, Plain and Tall, I grew up watching the movies, so by the time I read the books they didn't live up to my expectations. However they are nice little books.

I'm working my way through a medium size stack of library books, I finished reading The House At the End of the Moor by Michelle Griep last night. It was pretty good. Now I'm reading Popes and Feminists by Elise Crapuchettes, Epic: An Around-the-World Journey through Christian History by Tim Challies, and Sabotage by Neal Bascomb.

SnowAngel


He who counts the stars and calls them by their names is in no danger of forgetting His own children. — C.H. Spurgeon

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Posted : July 8, 2020 12:43 pm
stargazer
(@stargazer)
Member Moderator
Posted by: @wanderer
 
My favorite short story is “There Will Come Soft Rains” because of the figurative language alone. Bradbury creates wonderful atmosphere, and ties in the title very well. What are your favorite Bradbury short stories? 

That short story is also included in Bradbury's collection The Martian Chronicles, which I first read a very long time ago. The imagery in it has stuck with me all these years!

But all night, Aslan and the Moon gazed upon each other with joyful and unblinking eyes.

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Posted : July 9, 2020 5:09 pm
fantasia
(@fantasia)
Member Admin
Posted by: @snowangel

Has anyone gotten chapter two of The Silent Bells?

Just got my copy yesterday!

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Posted : July 11, 2020 11:06 am
SnowAngel liked
SnowAngel
(@snowangel)
Maiden of Monday Madness Moderator
Posted by: @fantasia
Posted by: @snowangel

Has anyone gotten chapter two of The Silent Bells?

Just got my copy yesterday!

Mine arrived yesterday too, along with chapter one! Grin It's so awesome. Now that I have it, I really really wish I gotten a second subscription, one to read and one to save. Smile  

I've made a little progress on each of the books I currently reading, I'm really enjoying Epic by Tim Challies.

And I am nearly done with the audiobook of Pilgrim's Progress.

SnowAngel


He who counts the stars and calls them by their names is in no danger of forgetting His own children. — C.H. Spurgeon

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Posted : July 11, 2020 12:45 pm
johobbit
(@jo)
SO mod; WC captain Moderator

Well, I'm a little behind. Giggle   I just received my copy of The Dragon's Tooth. Grin I have a bunch of other books I wanted to read yet this summer, but I will try and set some of them aside in order to begin TDT fairly soon. And yay for those who have received the second chapter of The Silent Bells!

Posted by: @snowangel

I'm really enjoying Epic by Tim Challies.

Cool, SnowAngel! We just received the DVD, and have been gradually going through it. SO interesting. Challies is not a dynamic speaker, but he is very solid and an excellent writer! And I would rather have that combination than the other way 'round. Giggle I know of him from way back when he was the IT guy for a small (yet busy) book/music store at which I worked very part-time years ago. Who would have guess then that he would blossom to such a well-known, respected blogger in the Christian community?! He lives just over an hour east of us, closer to Toronto.

Posted by: @snowangel

And I am nearly done with the audiobook of Pilgrim's Progress.

Who reads the audio of The Pilgrim's Progress, @SnowAngel? Love that book!

I am 3/4 of the way through Uncle Tom's Cabin. What a book! Stowe's writing is really engagin; riveting! Put that together with the subject matter and ... wow!

 

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Posted : July 11, 2020 2:43 pm
ForeverFan
(@foreverfan)
NarniaWeb Guru

@johobbit, I read Uncle Tom's Cabin many years ago now (I was probably 12 or 13), I don't remember much about it, except that I was glad I read it. I'm glad you're reading/enjoying (if enjoying is the right word for such a book) it now. 

I'm currently re-reading Anne of Green Gables, and I hope to read through the entire series this year. I don't remember the last time I read the series, but I think this would be the first time in my adult years. Naturally, there is so much more that I'm getting out of the story that I didn't quite get when I was younger. I love Montgomery's descriptions of flowers and of Prince Edward Island. 

When it comes to other reading, I normally re-read LotR every summer, but I sort of don't feel like it this year. Of course, there's still time in the summer left, so we'll see if I get to it. 🙂 

Dear days of old, with the faces in the firelight,
Kind folks of old, you come again no more.
(Robert Louis Stevenson)

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Posted : July 11, 2020 6:54 pm
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fantasia
(@fantasia)
Member Admin
Posted by: @foreverfan

When it comes to other reading, I normally re-read LotR every summer

You know, it's funny. I probably give LOTR and Narnia a reread every 5-10 years or so. The problem is that after I read them, all other books just seem so grey and bland.

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Posted : July 12, 2020 8:10 am
johobbit
(@jo)
SO mod; WC captain Moderator

Enjoy the Anne series, ForeverFan! And have I said yet, it's so good to see you pop in here again. Grin Have you ever read LMM's journals (five thick books)? Fascinating, and also tough because of where her life goes.

I am just past the part in Uncle Tom's Cabin where

Spoiler
Tom's kind, albeit carefree, master died unexpectedly, and Tom is sold to a brutally cruel master. This section, in particular, is heart-wrenching. I almost can't get through it for the emotional toll it takes.
As for re-reading The LotR and The CoN, I read them alternate years. This year it's The LotR. I usually begin towards the end of the summer/early fall, nearly at Bilbo and Frodo's birthdate, Sept. 22. Smile  But I have so many other interesting books that I wanted to get read this year (mostly biographies), that at one point I thought I would leave LotR for next year, but in thinking more about this, I really don't want to interrupt my age-old biennial tradition, so have determined to start The Fellowship of the Rings in a month or two. My husband just finished a re-read a few months ago, so he also has spurred me on.

Posted by: @fantasia

The problem is that after I read them, all other books just seem so grey and bland.

Particularly other fiction, hear-hear!

 

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Posted : July 13, 2020 12:15 pm
SnowAngel
(@snowangel)
Maiden of Monday Madness Moderator
Posted by: @jo
Posted by: @snowangel

I'm really enjoying Epic by Tim Challies.

Cool, SnowAngel! We just received the DVD, and have been gradually going through it. SO interesting. Challies is not a dynamic speaker, but he is very solid and an excellent writer! And I would rather have that combination than the other way 'round. Giggle I know of him from way back when he was the IT guy for a small (yet busy) book/music store at which I worked very part-time years ago. Who would have guess then that he would blossom to such a well-known, respected blogger in the Christian community?! He lives just over an hour east of us, closer to Toronto.

Cool! I'm just over halfway through the book, I got sidetracked playing games with the siblings this week thus cutting into my evening reading time. I was hoping the library would get the DVD too, but so far they haven't, so I decided to go ahead and order it. Who am I kidding...I was going to order it soon rather than later anyway. Giggle  

Posted by: @jo
Posted by: @snowangel

And I am nearly done with the audiobook of Pilgrim's Progress.

Who reads the audio of The Pilgrim's Progress, @SnowAngel? Love that book!

It's read by Mark Christensen. I've read three kids' versions, but it has been years and I definitely didn't appreciate the story the last time. The audiobook is The Pilgrim's Progress and the sequel, so I am now hearing the sequel for the first time. Smile  

SnowAngel


He who counts the stars and calls them by their names is in no danger of forgetting His own children. — C.H. Spurgeon

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Posted : July 18, 2020 1:41 pm
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fantasia
(@fantasia)
Member Admin

I finally actually READ the first two chapters of The Silent Bells (after getting over my paranoia of damaging them Tongue ). Not bad, not bad at all, but I'm trying to decide if I want to read any more until I have the complete set. Even the minor cliffhangers drive me crazy. Can't imagine how I will handle it when things REALLY pick up. Nail biting  

Now, I have a question for my fellow bookworms out there. I need your help with a project! I'm starting to compile a list of early Americana historical fiction or non-fiction that's appropriate for grade school kids. Things like Johnny Tremain or The Witch of Blackbird Pond, etc etc. Particularly surrounding Native Americans, Revolutionary War, and the founding of the USA. What are your favorite books from this time period? Can be anything. 🙂 

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Posted : July 23, 2020 9:32 pm
Meltintalle
(@mel)
Member Moderator

@fantasia, I've been thinking about the American Girl books lately, so I'll start my list there. Giggle  

  • Felicity series by Valerie Tripp (1776)
  • Kaya series by Janet Shaw (1764)

American Girl did a series called History Mysteries

  • Shadows in the Glasshouse by Megan McDonald (1621)
  • Mystery on Skull Island by Elizabeth McDavid Jones (1724)
  • Trouble at Fort La Point by Kathleen Ernst (1732)
  • Enemy in the Fort by Sarah Masters Buckey (1754)
  • Betrayal at Cross Creek by Kathleen Ernst (1775)

I think this was supposed to mimic the American Girl format, but didn't get very far

  • Secret of the Missing Teacup by Marianne Hering (1797)
  • The Mockingbird Mystery by Marianne Hering (1801)
  • The Silver Suspect by Marianne Hering (1812)

Bethlehem Books has a selection from this time period but these are the two I remember reading

  • Madeline Takes Command by Ethel C. Brill (1690)
  • The Reb and the Redcoats by Constance Savery (1776) (takes place in England; also, Enemy Brothers takes place in the same house during WWII and is one of my favorites!)

Kenneth Thomasma has a series called Amazing Indian Children

  • Om-kas-toe: Blackfoot Twin Captures Elkdog by Kenneth Thomasma (1700)
  • Children of the Longhouse by Joseph Bruchac (1600)
  • The Gift of the Sacred Dog by Paul Goble (you've probably seen his art; it's stunning)

Marguerite Henry is famous for her horse books. Only one of these has a horse. They're all excellent.

  • Benjamin West and His Cat Grimalkin by Marguerite Henry (1740)
  • Rubert Fulton, Boy Craftsman by Marguerite Henry (1770)
  • Justin Morgan Had a Horse by Marguerite Henry (1791)

I read a lot of the Dear America series and a significant number of My Name Is America as well as most of the spin-offs. See also: American Diaries and Christian Heritage

For giggles and laughs

  • Ben and Me: An Astonishing Life of Benjamin Franklin by His Mouse Amos by Robert Lawson
  • Mr. Revere and I: Being an Account of Certain Episodes in the Career of Paul Revere Esq. as Revealed by his Horse by Robert Lawson 

Battle of King's Mountain (1780) - ranked by personal preference 

  • Rebel Siege by Jim Kjelgaard 
  • Silent Scot: Frontier Scout by Constance Lindsay Skinner
  • Who Comes to King's Mountain? by John and Patricia Beatty (this one probably won't appeal to kids, but I bring it up so I can recommend reading Who Comes? after Bonnie Dundee by Rosemary Sutcliff because my personal headcanon is that the protagonists there aged into the grandparents(?) in this one; @valiantarcher would probably say read Douglas Bond's Crown and Covenant series at the same time for the Scottish Church history angle)

I feel like I ought to be able to do similar sections on Boston during the Revolutionary War, or Fort Ticonderoga, or Vermont, but I'm currently blanking on concrete recommendations. Silly  

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Posted : July 24, 2020 4:38 pm
shastastwin
(@shastastwin)
Member Moderator Emeritus

fantasia, I remember loving a book called Pocahontas: True Princess by Mari Danes when I was a kid. I read it several times. It's a novel-style rendition of Pocahontas' life based on the historical records of the time.

 

Well, I'm slowly diving further into N.D. Wilson's body of work. I was fortunate enough to be able to attend a virtual writer's conference recently which had Wilson as a keynote speaker. He's very inspiring and it gave me a new drive to read more of his works. I'm reading Boys of Blur right now, as well as Tolkien's translation of Beowulf (since it's one of the main inspirations for Wilson's book).

"All the world will be your enemy, Prince with a Thousand Enemies. And when they catch you, they will kill you. But first they must catch you..."
Inexhaustible Inspiration

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Posted : July 24, 2020 9:17 pm
ValiantArcher
(@valiantarcher)
BC Head and G&B Mod Moderator

@mel, you know me so well. Giggle @fantasia, I'm not sure I have anything to add to your list, as Mel's looks pretty exhaustive, BUT if you do end up reading Bonnie Dundee, I would recommending balancing it with something from the Scottish Covenanting perspective. Douglas Bond's Crown and Covenant series is the only fictional representation I've seen and, while it's been a long time, we enjoyed reading it together as a family when it first came out. Smile  

@shastastwin, I'd be curious to hear what your thoughts are on Boys of Blur when you finish. I just read it for the first time at the beginning of the year, but I was trying to describe it to a friend today actually - besides being very firmly set in the geography, Southern Gothic was what came to mind, in addition to the Beowulf influences. Not sure it's the right description, though. Giggle  

Some days you battle yourself and other monsters.
Some days you just make soup.

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Posted : July 26, 2020 4:29 pm
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