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Top Tear-Jerking Moments In Narnia

Jasmine
(@jasmine_tarkheena)
NarniaWeb Junkie

Narnia even has some tear jerking moments. These are moments that tug at your heart strings or have you shed a tear, knowing how the character feels.

7. Shasta Among the Tombs from The Horse and His Boy- There is a whole chapter where after Shasta have been in Tashbaan, he walks among the tomb. I put it low on the list because the chapter itself never got me emotional. It is still pretty touching to read about what Shasta is going through. It is the cat that comforts him that gets me.

6. Old Narnia in Danger from Prince Caspian- Caspian realizes that Old Narnia was now in danger. On the way to Aslan's Howe, everything was going wrong. You feel the emotion there.

5. Aslan's Death from The Lion, The Witch, And The Wardrobe- I'm sure you saw this one coming. It's sad to read about the Great Lion die at the hands of the White Witch. From a religious stand point, He is taking Edmund's place, and He comes to life. You feel the emotion that Susan and Lucy do, when it seems that all hope for Narnia is gone. 

4. Digory Realizing that Aslan Shares his grief from The Magician's Nephew- Digory asks Aslan if there was anything He could to do help his mother who was at the point of death. Aslan shares his grief, and says, "I know! Grief is great! You and I know only know it yet." It is so emotional to read about Aslan knowing what Digory was about to go through. Perhaps Aslan was feeling that grief that evil had been brought to the newly created world of Narnia.

3. King Tirian tied to a tree in from The Last Battle- There are a lot of sad moments in The Last Battle, because it touches on heavy themes of life and death. However, one particular that really gets me is where Tirian is tied up to a tree. It is a such a depressing chapter. It seemed that things were at their worst. Then Tirian remembers throughout Narnia history, everything had turned out alright in the end. Reading a chapter like that, I actually feel sorry for him.

2. Reaching the World's End from Voyage of the Dawn Treader- It is the climax in the book and it's emotional. I actually shed a tear because it's a touching climax, realizing that Caspian and his crew had reached the world's end. Caspian wanted to see it, but realizes he can't. It wasn't his time.

1. Caspian's death and resurrection from The Silver Chair- this scene gets me emotionally drained. It's touching to read about Caspian being reunited with his son Rilian for a brief moment before he dies. Eustace and Jill take the time to mourn for Caspian... even Aslan is mourning for him. Then Aslan brings Caspian back to life in His country. I tear up whenever I read that moment.

What are moments in Narnia that make you cry?

 

 

"And this is the marvel of marvels, that he called me beloved."
(Emeth, The Last Battle)
https://escapetoreality.files.wordpress.com/2010/03/aslan-and-emeth2.jpg

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Topic starter Posted : January 21, 2022 7:18 pm
Narnian78 liked
rainyweather
(@rainyweather)
NarniaWeb Nut

Aslan's death was the biggest tearjerker for me. I knew it was coming. I knew what would happen. I had already seen the Walden movie and read the book once, both when I was a bit younger. I think the moment in the movie when I first saw it was more scary than sad to me, and when I read the book in fifth grade, I was too young and so much of it went over my head. Rereading it when I was older, however, I was able to fully comprehend that Aslan was trading his life for Edmund personally- Edmund, who had to betrayed Aslan, his own family, and all the good Narnians. Not only the sorrow of Aslan's death, but the beauty of his boundless love overpowered me with strong emotions. Knowing Aslan would defy death and come back provided enough comfort for me to (with a great exercise of willpower) keep from crying, though only barely.

Some other moments I remember really affecting me and nearly bringing me to tears are Reepicheep going to Aslan's kingdom in VDT (it was really a bittersweet moment), Caspian's death in SC (it was too quick and shocking to make me cry, though), and the 'last battle' in LB (particularly when the dwarfs shoot the talking horses and when Eustace dies, especially Jill's reaction).

“‘Now, Curdie!’ she cried, ‘won’t you believe what I told you about my grandmother and her thread?’...
‘There! - don’t you see it shining on before us?’ she added.
‘I don’t see anything,’ persisted Curdie.
‘Then you must believe without seeing,’ said the princess; ‘for you can’t deny it has brought us out of the mountain.’
- The Princess and the Goblin by George MacDonald

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Posted : January 21, 2022 9:20 pm
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Narnian78
(@narnian78)
NarniaWeb Nut

@jasmine_tarkheena 

All of the scenes mentioned here are emotionally moving, and I think there is one more. It was very sad for me to read that the talking trees were being cut down in The Last Battle. It reminded me of how insensitive developers will destroy endangered wildlife in our world (and sometimes it is only to make money). I think Lewis was saying that we should always have respect for the natural world. If Lewis were living today I think he would certainly have been an environmentalist. 🙂

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Posted : January 22, 2022 2:42 am
Jasmine
(@jasmine_tarkheena)
NarniaWeb Junkie
Posted by: @narnian78

@jasmine_tarkheena 

All of the scenes mentioned here are emotionally moving, and I think there is one more. It was very sad for me to read that the talking trees were being cut down in The Last Battle. It reminded me of how insensitive developers will destroy endangered wildlife in our world (and sometimes it is only to make money). I think Lewis was saying that we should always have respect for the natural world. If Lewis were living today I think he would certainly have been an environmentalist. 🙂

I actually didn't think about that. I am not an environmentalist but I do have respect for nature. As a Christian, I'm sure God feels sad about how His creation is being treated. As you've mentioned, I think the Calormenes cut down the trees to help Shift gain power by selling the logs. It almost makes me think of movies like Ferngully: The Last Rainforest and Pocahontas, where it touches on destruction of nature. Both The Last Battle and Pocahontas have a theme about destroying forests and a greedy leader conquering the world and seeking to gain more power.

"And this is the marvel of marvels, that he called me beloved."
(Emeth, The Last Battle)
https://escapetoreality.files.wordpress.com/2010/03/aslan-and-emeth2.jpg

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Topic starter Posted : January 22, 2022 8:58 am
Narnian78
(@narnian78)
NarniaWeb Nut

@jasmine_tarkheena 

I think people should become environmentalists as much as possible if they are Christians. Sometimes the choices in protecting Nature are difficult to make, but I have seen too much of the natural world lost to greed. Even in C.S. Lewis’ home The Kilns there are only about one and a half acres saved of the house and the surrounding woods.  I learned this from the online tour a few months ago. I have never been there in person, but I took the online tour.  It seems regrettable that more of the woods which inspired Narnia weren’t saved.  Lewis passed away many years ago, but he would be very sad if he knew how much forest and natural areas were lost in England since his death.  We have the same problem here in America in that the natural world is disappearing very fast.  So I would encourage people to join the National Audubon Society, Nature Conservancy, National Wildlife Federation, and local conservation groups to protect wildlife and natural areas.  By helping those organizations one is being an environmentalist. I think Lewis himself was an environmentalist in writing the Narnia books since he always had respect for Nature in his stories.

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Posted : January 22, 2022 11:29 am
Jasmine
(@jasmine_tarkheena)
NarniaWeb Junkie

@narnian78 

We had wild fires in the State of Oregon about a year ago or two, and it destroyed a lot of forests. Sometimes I wonder if the stable in The Last Battle was made from the trees where the dryads lived that the Calormenes cut down.

In talking about tear jerking, as I've mentioned, the moment where Caspian is reunited briefly with his son Rilian then dies then is brought back to life in Aslan's country has me emotionally drained. The plot is about that Caspian was about to die without an heir after having lost his son who had vanished over ten years ago, and they've lost many Narnians trying to find the prince. It is a touching moment to read about Caspian seeing his son for the last time before he dies. Eustace and Jill are mourning the death of Caspian... even Aslan mourns for him. Yet Aslan brings Caspian back to life in His country. It's like saying death is not the end of the story. Having a great uncle who died last February, I can't deny what happened. Knowing where he is at, I have the hope that I will see him again. So that's the idea that it's sad that Caspian dies, but when Aslan's brings him back to life in His country, he is in a better place. As @gp often likes to talk about, it emphasis on despair and hope.

"And this is the marvel of marvels, that he called me beloved."
(Emeth, The Last Battle)
https://escapetoreality.files.wordpress.com/2010/03/aslan-and-emeth2.jpg

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Topic starter Posted : January 22, 2022 11:38 am
Glenwit
(@glenwit)
NarniaWeb Nut

The ending of the Last Battle always gets me. All the reunions, Reepicheep being there to greet them, Aslan's closing monologue. 

It's just a perfect ending. 

This is the journey
This is the trial
For the hero inside us all
I can hear adventure call
Here we go

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Posted : February 1, 2022 8:21 pm
coracle
(@coracle)
NarniaWeb's Auntie Moderator

I think the partings are more tear-jerking than the reunions. Perhaps this is an age-group thing for me, having said goodbye to a few people who I might not see again in this life.
But there are consolations: Lucy and Edmund say goodbye to Aslan at the end of VDT - and Aslan tells them it is not goodbye. 

There, shining in the sunrise, larger than they had seen him before, shaking his mane (for it had apparently grown again) stood Aslan himself.
"...when a willing victim who had committed no treachery was killed in a traitor's stead, the Table would crack and Death itself would start working backwards."

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Posted : February 1, 2022 10:31 pm
Kokoro Hane, Courtenay, Jasmine and 1 people liked
Cleander
(@the-mad-poet)
NarniaWeb Guru

Like Jasmine, I found the moment of Aslan sharing Digory's grief to be a huge tear-jerker.

      It's possibly the heaviest moment in the Chronicles. Seeing this desperate child on the verge of losing his mother begging for one last chance to save her life is one cause for tears in itself, but the moment that he sees the most powerful being in the world weeping with him is huge. It says so much about the love of God, the problem of why suffering exists,  and the weight of grief. For those who know about Lewis losing his own mother at the age of 5, this hits with double impact- it's like he's saying what he wishes he could have told himself back then. 

This post was modified 5 months ago by Cleander

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Posted : February 1, 2022 11:02 pm
Jasmine
(@jasmine_tarkheena)
NarniaWeb Junkie
Posted by: @the-mad-poet

Like Jasmine, I found the moment of Aslan sharing Digory's grief to be a huge tear-jerker.

      It's possibly the heaviest moment in the Chronicles. Seeing this desperate child on the verge of losing his mother begging for one last chance to save her life is one cause for tears in itself, but the moment that he sees the most powerful being in the world weeping with him is huge. It says so much about the love of God, the problem of why suffering exists,  and the weight of grief. For those who know about Lewis losing his own mother at the age of 5, this hits with double impact- it's like he's saying what he wishes he could have told himself back then. 

We've talked about in our Sunday School class when we did The Magician's Nephew, how it connects with the shortest verse, "Jesus wept." Douglas Gresham even said in the introduction of the Focus On The Family Radio Theatre adaption of The Magician's Nephew that both C.S. Lewis and Douglas Gresham have each lost a mother when they were young.

 

"And this is the marvel of marvels, that he called me beloved."
(Emeth, The Last Battle)
https://escapetoreality.files.wordpress.com/2010/03/aslan-and-emeth2.jpg

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Topic starter Posted : February 2, 2022 4:03 pm
Courtenay
(@courtenay)
NarniaWeb Guru Hospitality Committee

I don't think any scene in the Chronicles has ever quite literally brought me to tears (I don't cry that easily... except when I do), but for me the closest — certainly the most wrenching — is the climax of The Magician's Nephew, beginning with the scene where Jadis, having failed to persuade Digory to eat the apple for himself and become immortal, tempts him to take it home and use it to heal his mother instead:

"Oh!" gasped Digory as if he had been hurt, and put his hand to his head. For he knew now that the most terrible choice lay before him.

It's strong stuff for a children's book — I don't think I appreciated quite how strong when I first read this as a 7-year-old. Digory is being given the choice of disobeying Aslan and saving his mother's life — the thing he wants most in the world — or obeying Aslan and losing his mother. And as the Witch herself puts it:

"What has the Lion ever done for you that you should be his slave?... And what would your Mother think if she knew that you could have taken her pain away and given her back her life and saved your Father's heart from being broken, and that you wouldn't — that you'd rather run messages for a wild animal in a strange world that is no business of yours?"

The Witch then accuses Aslan further of making Digory "heartless" and "cruel" and "pitiless": "That is what he does to everyone who listens to him" — and really, her brutal logic is almost impeccable. Digory barely knows Aslan — and almost certainly doesn't know yet who Aslan is in our world — and the only things that save him from making the wrong choice here are his knowledge that the Witch is evil and her misstep in suggesting he could leave Polly behind, along with (as we're reminded later in the chapter) the memory of "the shining tears in Aslan's eyes" that assures him afterwards that he did do the right thing. But it is nevertheless truly a horrifying moment and a genuine heart-wrenching struggle. Of course on a deeper level Lewis is getting at the heart of what it means to be a follower of Christ, in ways that are hard to put into words, but he does it so perfectly in this one striking scene that I'm not going to try to make further comments about it.

This is followed by one of the biggest eucatastrophes (to borrow Tolkien's term!) in the Chronicles, when in the next chapter Aslan explains that it would have brought no joy if Digory had taken the apple for his mother (this goes against Aslan's twice previously stated rule that no-one is ever told what would have happened, but never mind!)...

And Digory could say nothing, for tears choked him and he gave up all hopes of saving his Mother's life; but at the same time he knew that the Lion knew what would have happened, and that there might be things more terrible even than losing someone you love by death. But now Aslan was speaking again, almost in a whisper:

"That is what would have happened, child, with a stolen apple. It is not what will happen now. What I give you now will bring joy. It will not, in your world, give endless life, but it will heal. Go. Pluck her an apple from the Tree."

I'm pretty sure there have been critics — especially anti-religious ones — who've pilloried this as a magical turn-around of events that isn't fair on children in the real world who've seen loved ones die and who weren't given any fairy-tale cure-all to save them. All I can say to that is: C.S. Lewis himself lost his own mother when he was only 9 years old, and it was undoubtedly one of the most devastating events of his life. (I've never forgotten his simple summing-up of how that felt to him, in Surprised by Joy: "It was all sea and islands now; the great continent had sunk like Atlantis.") That tragic loss was probably one of the key factors that contributed to him becoming an atheist from his teens to his early 30s. And yet, when writing a story in which another young boy's mother is dying, Lewis made the decision to give Digory the happy ending that he himself didn't get. Regardless of why he chose to write that part of the plot the way he did, he can't be accused of writing about something he had no knowledge of...

(Sorry to have gone slightly off topic here, but this scene does at least bring me pretty close to tears!)

"Now you are a lioness," said Aslan. "And now all Narnia will be renewed."
(Prince Caspian)

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Posted : February 3, 2022 12:15 pm
Jasmine
(@jasmine_tarkheena)
NarniaWeb Junkie

@courtenay I actually haven't thought of that one. Digory has been wanting to save his mother's life, but he knew well that if he stole it and take it back to her, it wouldn't be the right way to do it. It will be interesting how Netflix will pull this off. I think where Jadis tempts Digory to steal the apple is the climax of the story. It's like what choice is he going have to make. Should he give in to her temptations or should he obey Aslan's instructions?

"And this is the marvel of marvels, that he called me beloved."
(Emeth, The Last Battle)
https://escapetoreality.files.wordpress.com/2010/03/aslan-and-emeth2.jpg

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Topic starter Posted : February 3, 2022 12:19 pm
Kokoro Hane
(@kokoro-hane)
NarniaWeb Regular

Upon my re-reading of The Magician's Nephew, one scene really touched me and tugged at my heartstrings like it never did before. That is, when Digory was pleading for something that could save his mother, and he saw tears in Aslan's eyes. That just really got to me this time. Especially when its referenced again on his adventure to retrieve the silver apple, and he remembered Aslan's tears and knowing they were genuine. To see that this great Lion seems to feel and understand his pain, and feel so sorry for what Digory has to go through. It also makes the moment when he's allowed to take an apple home so satisfying. It was a great way to show our pain does not go unnoticed.

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Posted : March 23, 2022 8:19 pm
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